Fitness Fads That Are A Huge Fat Lie

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People want to be fit, in shape, and sexy. But people are also lazy. And because a number of con artists know this, there have been fitness fads created that guarantee results in weeks, days, even hours, with little to no effort. So of course they not only don’t work, they drain you of your money, and some, actually make you fatter. So here’s the top fitness fad fat lies out there that you’ll definitely want to avoid.
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Electronic Ab Exerciser

So this contraption promised that if you just strap it on, it’d send fat burning electric currents to your mid-section, leaving you with a six-pack by the time you’re done. Of course, you can’t lose fat this way – and even if you could – your body would look ridiculous with a toned stomach, but flabby arms and a triple chin. All the Electronic Ab Exerciser did was zap you of your time, and money.
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The Crunch Craze

This was a video prices for like $19.95 that promised you a stunning six-pack if you just did a shit load of crunches and sit-ups. But in case you’ve been living under a health and fitness rock, diet and weight loss exercises give you abs – not crunches.
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Exercise In A Bottle

This one’s for those that want to do steroids, without having to do steroids or the health and legal implications that come with it. They claimed to increase your metabolism, helping you to burn fat quicker. But the truth of the matter is that they were nothing more than sugar pills that were in effect, useless.
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Sexercise

Don’t be fooled by a number of books saying that sex is the best workout you can do. Sure, it burns some calories (although not enough to substantially make you lose weight). But also, what if you can’t get laid? This exercise program is not only fatuous, but cruelly flies in the face of partner-less people.
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24-Hour Arm Workout

This program promised a 3/8-inch gain on your arms in just 24 hours! The deceptively smart people behind this scam prayed on the ignorance of many that that 3/8-inch gain is all inflammation from exercising (which everyone gets) – and not actual muscle growth.
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ThighMaster

Famously endorsed by Suzanne Somers back in the 90’s, the ThighMaster promised you fitter, toned thighs by using it – while watching your favorite soaps no less. Many realized very quickly that all they got for their $19.95 was some very sore legs, and a flabbier stomach.
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Vibrating Platforms

Those looking to shake up their exercise routine (literally), turned to the Vibrating Platforms. The idea being that you can literally shake off the pounds by enduring the intensity of a machine that treats you like fruit in a blender. Needless to say, sales were shaky.
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This Picture

While not an exercise program, this is the biggest and longest running scam in the fitness field. Easily, 90% of those before and after pictures that sell you on some crappy product are reversed. The before is really the after, and vice versa. All they do is take an already very fit and muscular person, and make them gain a ton of weight for a couple of weeks.
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